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people that really didn't experience the civil rights movement in the united states. they see this as a landscape of opportunity, and there is room for growth. and so i knew about that, as a young person, in the 90's and i grew up in the south, so in 90s in the south, you can still had a great deal of racial tension. and my parents made sure i knew about nelson, and i think my schoolmates did as welt. >> so it is so personal to so many people. including african-americans in the united states. because there are sort of in some ways parallel tracts. talk about the u.s., and apartheid in south africa, right? >> we picketed with with them. we were there. >> we appreciate it. and president obama has paid tribute to the life of nelson mandela as well. >> that swept college campuses at that time, the first time he ever spoke to a public audience, he had said many times was on behalf of nelson mandela and the antiapartheid movement. he came to the briefing room, he spoke very eloquently. here is more of what he had to say. >> at his trial in 1964. nelson mandela closed a statement fro
about him and prayed for him all the years in prison. while the american civil rights movement was going on here in this country and here in los angeles. he came to visit the first ame churn only a few months after he was released from prison in south africa. they have pictures of him on the walls inside. it was a big moment for them here. we did get a chance earlier today to speak to one of the parishioners about meeting nelson mandela. >> i'll always remember that. what a blessing to meet this gentle man. more than anything in life, the one that taught us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive, but he told us to forgive. it's the most important asset of our life, to forgive and move on, yes. he is my hero. he is my papa. >> reporter: as you can tell, she, too, was born in aftrica bt been here for 27 years. they're remembering nelson mandela here today but remember him at the first ame church virtually forever. richelle. >> can you talk more about the special connection this church teams to nelson mandela? >> reporter: it's because he came here. his grandsons came her
. >> nelson mandela's life work extended behind the native south africa. we sat with civil rights leader the reverend jessie jackson, and he drew parallels with his movement and the struggle in the u.s. >> there was a sameness about the struggle there and here. both faced persecution in 1953. king was gaoled and bricked and stabbed at 39. nelson mandela was gaoled and put on the terrorist list by the u.s. government and emerged as a moral authority, both have that moral character. barack obama on the other hand - he was the ben factor of the struggles. he's a generation behind. >> nelson mandela and the king were transformative figures. >> we saw a picture of you and nelson mandela with one of my colleagues, morgan radford, who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew. >> i must say when i was in cape down south africa, he was released. immediately he recognised me and called my name. i was overwhelmed. he knew it was going on. he was current, alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day, he wrote it. he also was a great debater
thurners candles and stood with others praying for the civil rights leader. there were scenes like this across sfrikdz today. more now from al jazeera nick schifrin. >> nelson mandela talked about a rainbo nation. his struggle wasn't on behalf of black south africans but on behalf of all segregated and humiliated by racist rulers. >> nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. citizens of all races and religion say mandela created that had unity. at an interfaith service, south africans celebrated the respect that mandela provided them. >> celebrate. it's an important model for human society. >> it lions us to be. >> down the road at an indian rally, man dela was thanked on behalf of children. 20 years ago, perussia was a second-class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks. >> we were part of the deprived lot. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to find something to eat. we had to say to the guy. sorry, do you sell to us? he would say, no we don't but you guys can go a
. this is a major civil rights case and nationally known after hurricane katrina. they thought they had closure. now they know that they don't. >> that has to be true of the glover team. we've just seen those pictures. bell he continue to see that. thank you. >> the obama administration said it has met it's deadline to fix the website. the administration promised all would be well in november. we will gather to the white house with more details, mike, this was a big deadline for the administration. are all the problems with the website solved? >> reporter: they aren't all solved but they say its like night and day after that disastrous launch of octobe october 1st. they cite certain benchmarks, certain metrics, error rates down to 1%. they were 6% at the outset of this debacle in the estimation of administration officials. as many as 800,000 a day and they achieved 90% functionality. you recall that by the end of last month, november 31st they had promised an 80% functionality. by their own estimation they have exceeded that. but that's by their own estimation. for the time being we'
to the pending federal civil rights lawsuit hi filed against the department, the department had also been conducting its own investigation. it says it uses data not profiling to fight crime. >> if you have a black chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager, that does not make sense in a prodetermine innocently african-american city. >> i know the department didn't do inning wrong. >> he initially agreed to participate in the program. because of the crime in the area, it is an aggressive approach, which focuses on targeting small crimes like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. six years ago it was the 13th most violent city, last year it drops. >> police must take any concerns about racial profiling very seriously. or lose trust. >> by abusing the rights you ail len nate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> disenchanted he has now dropped out of the zero tolerance program, as for sampson, he says he now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> al jazeera, miami gardens. >> the record setting streak on wall street is quickly fading
they call foreign targets. civil rights campaigner say it's a breach of privacy. >> you are walking along minding your business thinking you'd never be of interest. if you have one of these there's every possibility that they are tracking where you've been and who you were speaking to. according to new documents, it's revealed that the american spy agency is somewhere snt region of the 5 billion pieces of information. here is how it works. you identified as an intelligence target. it's sending out signals as you are walking around. it can work out where you've been and who you've been speaking to. and if they also have a mobile phone. when you go online you may be able to encrypt your email and hide your identity. this is always broadcast. it's the size and scope that worries civil liberties campaigners. >> if we want a future that has people able to communicate and associate with each other, we need privacy of that future. >> this is not just a u.s. operation by the n.s.a. this is done on a global scale. it taps into information shared by the mobile phone companies and helps the intellig
the american years of civil rights struggle, and in those years when he was in prison they felt a connection to him which was completed when he actually came here in 1990. so you can imagine what a wonderful moment that was for him. so it's a special thing for him. there is a service dedicated to nelson mandela at 10:00 ot here this morning. of course they will be remembering him all day and for many years to come. we spoke to the senior pastor here just a little while ago. >> it is awfully difficult to memorialize because a memorial would be life lock for all of us, for the next four, five generations. because a person of his character, a person of his statute and commitment -- stature, will have a clear record of what he's done and i think his life will be much larger and much more impactful, in ten, 15, 15, 20, 25, 30 years now as it has been in the last ten, 15 years. >> they tell me that the night nelson mandela was released from prison in south africa they prayed here at the church all night long and when they got the news that he was released the whole place broke out into cheers. >>
's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. giving women the right to vote, that was hard. workers have the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been easy. for us to change how we do business in this country. >> reporter: so the president back on offense trying to put the last two months behind him and resell the affordable care act as the deadline of decembe december 23rd approach as soon as a winter storm is start to go make its way through the upper midwest after dumping snow in the west. let's take a look at these picture of a tractor trailer accident. the wow, the state highway parole said 300 car accidents across the wasatch front, a dozens of accidents were reported elsewhere in the state. let's go to dave warren. >> meteorologist: this is a wig storm and it will work its way across the mountains and bring cold air in and warm air from the south. that's the problem. the heavy snow dumped a lot of snow and caused a lot of problems on the roadway, and the cold air continues to move south. fast forward to now and tomorrow, here's the problem now we're getting w
hard. the civil rights movement was hard. giving me women the right to vo, that was hard. making sure we had the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been busy how we do business in this country. >> tony, the president has a wig problem. even with young people with startling statistics out of harvard, they came out with numbers. 39% of so-called millennials, 18 to 29-year-olds, only 39% approve of the affordable care act. 20%, just 20% of those polled intend to enroll. almost half do not intend to enroll. that could be bad news. >> mike, thank you ♪ >> mark morgan is here with the headlines in sports and big news for major college football. >> reporter: the prosecutor looking into sexual assault allegations against florida state quarterback jameis winston said that his investigation is complete, and he will announce his findings tomorrow afternoon. now william meggs said its up to prosecutors if there is enough evidence to charge winston and prosecutors have to decide if they charge is there a reasonable chance of conviction. that announcement is expected tomorrow. meanwhile
who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity.
inspiration from him during the civil rights days here in america, and they prayed for him and gave him their support all those years when he was in prison. and, of course, it was a big event here when only a few months after he got out of prison, he came to visit this church. it does beg the question how you memorialize this man in just one sermon. we spoke earlier to senior pastor j. edgar boyd? >> i he dismantled with the prison cell with the help of those here in america and other parts of the world, the giant, the you know grateful and the wronged giant of apartheid. he disassembled it and brought about hope, and it brought about liberation not only for himself but for peace-loving people throughout south africa. >> new mexico new mexico had been out of the public eye for many years before he died but there are parishioners here who met him and we spoke to one of them? >> what a blissing it meet in gentleman, more than anything in life, the one who told us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive. he told us to forgive. no forgive and move on. yes, et cetera my her
was really sad. >> miami gardens police chief won't say much about sampson's case, due to the pending civil rights lawsuit filed against his department. the department has conducted it's own investigation since last year. the chief says the department uses data, not profiling, to fight crime. >> you got a black chief, african-american chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager. that does not make sense. a predominantly trick american city, i know the department didn't do anything wrong. >> it's an aggressive policing approach, focusing on small crime like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. the department's zero tolerance policing program is effective. miami gardens was the 15t 15th most violent city of its size, last year dropped to the 40th. >> police must take con terrence about racial profiling seriously or lose local trust i don't by abusing the rights of so many people systematically, you alienate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> dis enchanted, sampson now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> they have spent about $20,
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
actually scrapped. this constitution is more emphasis that it's civil and more emphasis on people's freedoms and rights but many also feel that there is more power to the military which could mean less democracy. >> when the u.s. secretary of state john kerry was in cairo it was recognizing human rights more than democratic and what is the reaction to the way the constitution has now been shaped? >> we have already heard from americans regarding a new floor that was put in place and condemned it and said it had serious flaws and officials said the same thing and they call to the government to amendment. other provisions here that may find problematic. the u.s. is walking a delicate balance and doesn't want to interfere too much but also need to put enough pressure because many of the people expect them to do so when things are dipped to human rights violations and especially when it comes to the military getting more power. one thing we have to make clear is this referendum will be put to a vote and only if it's approved by the people the other steps and parliamentary elections an
of civil war in 2005. he denied there was any rift with his deputy. we have more from the sudanese capital. what has happened is a senior generalwho is a right hand man of the president has replaced him. it's important how the government sees it's need to maintain power it's a form of co-oco-opting him into power. it's kind of secured it in that sense. it's not clear how even if there are new faces in the government with the same old policies whether or not it will make a difference to being able to han handle the economic crisis this country faces. that is eric martin in car to k. >>> the u.s. says he is a war veteran. glorchlts th-9dthe saga for for. >> when merl newman made the trip to south korea he wouldn't know how difficult it b it wouln out. he is now back in the u.s. beside his wife with a message. >> it was a great homecoming and i'm tired and i'm with my family now. thank you all for the support we got and very much appreciate it. >> newman was a soldier in the korean war and his visit was a long planned vacation down memory lane. he was no orland ordinary soldi. the south korea
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16